Frequently Asked Questions



Q: How do I know my property has a Gopher or Mole pest problem?

A: Mounds of fresh soil are the best sign of a gopher's presence. Pocket Gopher problems occur when they form mounds as they dig tunnels and push the loose dirt to the surface. Typically mounds are crescent shaped. Mole mounds are sometimes mistaken for gopher mounds. Mole mounds are more circular in appearance. Unlike gophers, moles commonly burrow just beneath the surface, leaving a raised ridge to mark their path.


Q: How does Gopher Patrol get rid of moles and gophers?

A: We use a combination of gopher and mole traps depending on the tunnel systems that the Moles and Gophers are using.


Q: Why are traps used for removing these pests?

A: Trapping is the most effective method found to get rid of moles and gophers. Other methods have proven over many decades to be ineffective in removing moles and gophers. Don’t be fooled by a snake oil sales pitch, repellents, sonic deterrents, toxic fumes, explosions or some other form of futile attempt. We come out to set traps aggressively with speedy results you can count on.


Gopher Trap

A visual look at a Gopher’s tunnel system can give us insight on why most methods of extermination don’t work.


Smoke Bombs/Gases have a hard time reaching the animal. Gases go up or down and are not capable of doing both. Pressurized gases can be effective in tunnels capable of holding pressure such as those in extremely dry climates. In the Willamette Valley our ground is wet at Gopher depths year-round. Pressurizing permeable mud or loose soil is not a plausible solution.


Poison pellets/worms are a lost cause. Oregon has an abundance of natural food for moles and gophers. Moles and gophers choose their location based on their needs including food preferences. “A Donkey doesn’t want to eat straw when they have fresh apples".


Explosions are the most fun. Most insurance won’t cover explosions. Just like compressed gas results are rarely achieved unless conditions are perfect. When the conditions are right the ground and vegetation is dry holding explosive gas prior to ignition. Fires happen often in these scenarios. After treatment with explosions there is usually more digging on the same day.


Pesticides are sometimes used to eliminate the food source for moles. This is a temporary expensive experiment. A healthy yard is full of life and will return when the chemicals wear off. We’re not fans of unnecessary chemical applications and we end up catching the moles after worm/grub killer has been applied.


Traps always work when used properly. All of us have been looking for a magic fix. The closest we can get with our current technology is still traps set by an experienced professional trapping service and checked at regular intervals. Someday we may have small robots willing to go into the tunnels to do our work on the spot. When/if available we will evaluate our options and choose the best one. For the foreseeable future we must rely on trapping. We invest about 10-20k yearly on customized traps made in the USA to handle mole and gopher problems the right way.


Q: Are the mole/gopher traps safe for my pets?

A: Most definitely. We have never caught a pet or any livestock on our steel traps. Some styles of trap we use have a portion of the trap exposed. The exposed section is harmless as the business end is down deep focusing on the mole/gopher.

Gophers are rather tempting and quite tasty to carnivores and omnivores. Dogs may dig up a gopher trap containing a gopher as a snack. At this point the trap is inert as it has already sprung.


Q: How often do you check the mole and gopher traps?

A: We monitor our traps on a weekly basis. When Moles and Gophers are tunneling quickly we increase frequency of stops to finish them off quickly. Many other companies are quick to overbook and leave you hanging for weeks at a time or even disappear. We focus on solving as many pest problems as possible without leaving anybody behind.


Q: When do moles and gophers have their offspring?

A: Pocket gophers usually has their young in spring, but if conditions are right they have been known to have offspring anytime of the year. Properties at an elevation around 500’ plus seem to have a higher incidence of a second or even third run of pups.

Moles usually have their litter mid-late winter. This timeframe gives them an advantage as signs of activity are first noticed when we get back on top of our landscaping. Once mole activity is noticed the choices are limited. Either hope they go away or call us out to exterminate the moles and get your yard back.


Q: How do I know what made this hole or mound?

A:






Looks like this is the place. Heavy Mole mounds spread evenly across the landscape. This is likely the damage of 1-3 Moles in a matter of days.

Mole Hole






Voles (daily check on mouse traps preventing safe exit, poison, or habitat modification)

Both pictures to the right represent Vole activity. Voles are also known as “meadow mice.” Voles represent a widespread epidemic. Success can be achieved with Poisons or daily attention to mouse traps. Habitat modification efforts including removal of excess vegetation, Pepper spray in the holes and especially cats can reduce impact. The only reputable company we are aware of with real results measured over time using poison for Voles is Squish Pest Control. You can contact them online at www.squishpests.com or via phone (971)400-2477.

Vole Hole
Vole Hole








Rare species of extremely small mole captured in West Linn October 2017. We were lucky this one fit into the trap.

Vole Hole

Q: When are gophers and moles known to be active?

A: Gophers are active year-round, although you might not see any activity. They also can be active at all hours of the day building tunnels and feeding. Moles are active throughout these times as well. Younger moles and gophers can show little sign of activity as they are smaller than the tunnels created by their ancestors. As time goes on they will be forced to excavate mud accumulation and dirt that will increase in volume and frequency until they are fully grown. Mole and Gopher problems rarely get better on their own and can lead to “Mole Madness.”


Q: What are some more tools you use?

A:


Q: How do I know my property has a Gopher or Mole pest problem?

A: Mounds of fresh soil are the best sign of a gopher's presence. Pocket Gopher problems occur when they form mounds as they dig tunnels and push the loose dirt to the surface. Typically mounds are crescent shaped. Mole mounds are sometimes mistaken for gopher mounds. Mole mounds are more circular in appearance. Unlike gophers, moles commonly burrow just beneath the surface, leaving a raised ridge to mark their path.


Get in Touch!

We'd love to hear from you. You can either reach out to us as a whole and one of our awesome team members will get back to you, or if you have a specific question reach out to one of our staff.

503•487•6895   AlexGopherPatrol@Gmail.com

PO Box 3042 Newberg, OR 97132


Customer Testimonials

Areas Served Around Willamette Valley

Serving Hillsboro, Portland, Beaverton, Beavercreek, Barlow, Tualatin, Sherwood, West Linn, Lake Oswego, Oregon City, Wilsonville, Silverton, Gaston, Banks, Aloha, Hubbard, Donald, Lafayette, Dayton, Amity, Rickreal, Millersburg, Shaw, Butteville, Tigard, Kings Valley, North Plains, Newberg, McMinnville, Canby, Aurora, Woodburn, Yamhill, Carlton, Dundee, Cornelius, Molalla, Mulino, Mt. Angel, Silverton, Gervais, St. Paul, Brooks, Keizer, Salem, Forest Grove, Aumsville, Turner, Sheridan, Dallas, Monmouth, Independence, Jefferson, Philomath, Albany, Corvallis.

For moles on the east-side of the valley (Milwaukie, Gladstone, Portland, Troutdale, Gresham, Sandy) try Molemasters.